A mother’s love vs. Georgia’s “reefer madness”

Here at Georgia CARE, we love to share stories of people who are making a difference in the fight to legalize cannabis for medicine. Mothers and fathers all over Georgia are risking their freedom to help improve the lives of their children with cannabis oil.

As we go through the legislative process many have come forward to share the most personal aspects of their lives in an effort to educate lawmakers about the miracle medicine we call CANNABIS.

Bridgett Liquori is an outlaw, not that you’d know from looking at her. This petite 34-year-old single mother’s crime? She loves her children and is risking everything to keep them as happy, safe and healthy as possible.

If that means breaking  state and federal laws to get the medical cannabis her kids need to treat their daunting illnesses, then so be it.

“I never thought I’d be a marijuana activist,” says the self-described “Canna Mom” from Gwinnett County. “But this is about my kids so I really didn’t have much choice.”

“Canna Mom” Bridgett Liquori of Buford with children Jackson (center), William (left), Lillyauhna (right) and Giovanni (rear) at the Wylde Center in Oakhurst.

Liquori is part of grassroots movement devoted to reforming Georgia’s restrictive and nonsensical medical cannabis laws. In between taking care of her kids, Liquori spends time testifying at the state capitol, working with pro-marijuana groups such as the Georgia CARE Project and writing her own blog about the benefits of medical cannabis. She’s also keeping a nervously watchful eye on how the newly minted Trump administration will handle the marijuana industry that’s growing like a weed nationwide.

A native of upstate New York, Liquori did not come by her marijuana activism easily.

“I was scared,” she said while watching her kids play at a park in Oakhurst on an unseasonably warm Saturday morning. “I was afraid of someone coming to my house and taking my kids away because I’m doing something illegal. Even though (medical cannabis) is beneficial and helpful to them, the fear was there. A lot of days it’s still there. I worry if someone is going to kick my door in.”

Georgia doctor treats Autistic son with cannabis

oday, the second hearing on Georgia House Bill 65 (Medical Cannabis) was held in Atlanta. The Medical Cannabis Working Group chaired by Rep. Allen Peake invited a Georgia doctor to tell her story about how cannabis oil has improved her 17 year old autistic son’s life.

The committee voted to move the bill forward to the House Judiciary Non-Civil Committee for further consideration.

HB-65 expands the current law (HB-1) by adding additional medical conditions for which cannabis oil (CBD/THC) can be used and for other purposes.

State Rep. Allen Peake, R-Macon, chairs the working group and wrote House Bill 65, which will be the vehicle for their recommendations.

“I thought today was very productive,” said Peake, after the meeting. The working group is a special committee formed this year to work on the complexities of getting a substance to Georgians that’s prohibited under federal law. The roughly 1,200 Georgians on the state medical cannabis registry for diagnoses like severe seizure disorders can posses a liquid made from medical cannabis, though there is no legal way to obtain it. The working group also recommended that people with medical cannabis cards from other states should be allowed to posses that liquid.

2017 Map of US State Cannabis Laws

We noticed a lot of the state by state maps were out of date after the November election, so we went ahead and built this 2017 Map of US State Cannabis Laws with the most up to date reflection of state cannabis laws across the nation.

Adult Use refers to states in which cannabis is fully legal for adults over the age of 21. Particular conditions of their laws vary.

Medical refers to states in which full-plant medical use is legal. It requires a prescription from a doctor and states have different lists of approved medical conditions.

Limited refers to states that allow use of cannabis oil for medical reasons. The conditions vary from state to state, along with restrictions on the type of oil. Most are high-CBD, low-THC oil.

Illegal refers to states that completely prohibit the consumption